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CASE REPORT
An airway traffic jam: a plastic traffic cone masquerading as bronchial carcinoma
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  • Published on:
    Q: Retrospectively identified in the CT images?

    Sirs,

    I wonder whether that plastic toy could be spotted in the CT images by a reader who has been informed about it. Did the radiology department comment about this?

    I am pretty shure the cone cannot be detected on a plain x-ray. The ABS polymer used by toy manufacturers like Playmobile or Lego seems to have x-ray attenuation properties very near to human tissue (Saps et al., World J Clin Pediatr 201...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    A plastic traffic cone masquerading as bronchial carcinoma

    I felt that the article was highly informative. We as nurses and doctors see many patients each day and on some occasions we do not have answers for peculiar symptoms or pains a patient may complain of. In my opinion, the pains and symptoms, are there because there is a cause but the cause is not known to the examiner or the patient. It is my view that we do our best but we seldom go far enough before we label a pain or...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.