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CASE REPORT
Complicated small bowel diverticular disease: a case series
  1. Linden Karas1,
  2. Mohammed Asif2,
  3. Victor Chun3,
  4. Farrukh A Khan2
  1. 1Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  2. 2Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Darby, Pennsylvania, USA
  3. 3Internal Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mohammed Asif, mohammedasifmd12{at}gmail.com

Summary

Small bowel diverticulosis of the jejunum and ileum is an uncommon finding with a prevalence rate of 0.2% to 1.3% at autopsy and 0.3% to 1.9% on small bowel studies. Diagnosis can be difficult because there are no pathognomonic features or clinical symptoms that are specific for small bowel diverticulosis. Though rare, it is critical to keep the possibility of small bowel diverticulosis in mind when evaluating cases of malabsorption, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage, perforation and intestinal obstruction, especially in patients with connective tissue disorders, a family history of diverticula and a personal history of colonic diverticulosis. Guidelines for the treatment of complicated small bowel diverticulosis are not clearly defined. However, the consensus in treatment is to do a small bowel resection with primary anastomosis. We report three interesting cases of jejunoileal diverticula that presented in an occult manner and later progressed to more emergent manifestations.

  • Gastroenterology
  • Endoscopy
  • GI bleeding
  • Small intestine
  • Gastrointestinal surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors LK participated in conception and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data, writing and reviewing of manuscript.

    MA participated in conception and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data, writing and reviewing of manuscript.

    VC participated in data collection, writing and reviewing of manuscript.

    FAK took part in writing and reviewing of manuscript.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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