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CASE REPORT
Accurate diagnosis of iliac vein thrombosis in pregnancy with magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging (MRDTI)
  1. Charlotte E A Dronkers1,
  2. Alexandr Srámek2,
  3. Menno V Huisman3,
  4. Frederikus A Klok4
  1. 1Department of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, Leiden, The Netherlands
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, Leiden, The Netherlands
  3. 3Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands
  4. 4Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, Leiden, Zuid-Holland, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to Charlotte E A Dronkers, c.e.a.dronkers{at}lumc.nl

Summary

A pregnant woman aged 29 years, G1P0 at 21 weeks of gestation of a dichorionic diamniotic twin, presented with suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the left leg. Repeated (compression) ultrasonography was not diagnostic for DVT but showed reduced flow over the left external iliac vein, common femoral vein and superficial femoral vein. In pursue of a definite diagnosis, magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging was performed showing a clear high signal in the left common iliac vein which is diagnostic for acute thrombosis in this venous segment. Phase contrast venography supported this diagnosis, showing no flow in the left common iliac vein. Treatment with anticoagulants was started. 6 months after the diagnosis, the patient is doing well and does not report signs of post-thrombotic syndrome.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CD and EK wrote the manuscript and prepared the figure. AS revised the manuscript for important intellectual content and prepared the figure. MH revised the manuscript for important intellectual content.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.