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Rare disease
Rhabdomyolysis associated with polydipsia induced hyponatraemia
  1. Michael Bennett1,
  2. Gerry Fitzpatrick2,
  3. Maria Donnelly2
  1. 1Emergency Department, Adelaide and Meath incorporating the National Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  2. 2Anaesthetics and Intensive Care Department, Adelaide and Meath incorporating the National Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  1. Correspondence to Dr Michael Bennett, mbennett1977{at}gmail.com

Summary

A 41-year-old white male with a history of alcoholism and depression was brought from prison into the emergency department (ED) after having had a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure lasting approximately 5 min. During the 24 h prior to admission, the patient’s cell mate reported that he was restless and had consumed 11 litres of water. The patient had also been taking regular escitalopram for his depression. On arrival to the ED, the patient was found to have a sodium level of 112 mmol/l. After correction of his hyponatraemia the patient developed rhabdomyolisis with a creatine kinase level of 65 064 IU/l. To prevent an acute kidney injury a high volume alkaline diuresis protocol was started. Once corrected, his sodium level remained normal and he was discharged home after making a full neurological recovery. Rhabdomyolysis has rarely been associated with the correction of hyponatraemia.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

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