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Left ventricular non-compaction in an infant
  1. S-J Chen,
  2. W-J Lee,
  3. M-T Lin
  1. mtlin{at}ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

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This 49-day-old term male baby was born to a healthy mother by normal spontaneous delivery weighing 3260 g. Tachypnoea with subcostal retraction, gasping, general malaise, and poor appetite were noted from the age of 14 days. Echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with systolic dysfunction. The left ventricular ejection fraction was 35%. He had no familial history of cardiovascular disease. Contrast enhanced cardiac computed tomography (LightSpeed VCT, General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA) revealed severe thickening of the myocardium with prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses throughout the left ventricular walls (panel A). The thickness of the compacted layer was 22% of the left ventricular lateral wall. Virtual cardioscopy (Advantage Windows 4.3; General Electric Medical Systems, Paris, France) along the axis from the mitral inlet through to the LV apex well demonstrated the interlaced myocardial bundles in the septal, apical and lateral walls of the left ventricle (panel B; movies 1 and 2).

Panel A Axial image of computed tomography showing prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses throughout the left ventricle (LV). The diagram in the left upper corner represents the comparatively typical myocardial compaction of the LV in a 60-day-old male baby with normal cardiac structure.
Panel B Virtual cardioscopic view from left ventricular inlet towards the left ventricular apex demonstrating prominent interlaced myocardial bundles throughout the left ventricle. The comparative diagram in the left upper corner shows the significantly reduced trabeculation and smooth surface of the left ventricle in a 60-day-old male baby with normal cardiac structure. The diagrams in the right lower part of this figure and the comparative diagram of this figure depict the acquisition angle for these cardioscopic images. P is papillary muscle.

Acknowledgments

This article has been adapted from Chen S-J, Lee W-J, Lin M-T. Left ventricular non-compaction in an infant Heart 2008;94:295

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