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Atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome in a patient with severe Babesiosis
  1. Maryam Hajiabbasi,
  2. Nagma Shah,
  3. Navin Bhatt and
  4. Muhammad Saad Malik
  1. Department of Medicine, NYC Health + Hospitals / Elmhurst, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Elmhurst, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Maryam Hajiabbasi; mhabasi24{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Babesiosis is a tick-borne parasitic infection that can result in various haematological complications. This case report discusses a patient with severe Babesiosis complicated by an unorthodox presentation of Babesiosis-associated haemolytic uremic syndrome. Discussed here is the patient’s clinical course and the management strategies employed, with an emphasis on early recognition and treatment of renal failure in the context of severe Babesiosis. Haematologic manifestations of Babesia are common and the severity of disease is dependent on parasite load. While treatment options such as red blood cell exchange have been proposed for severe cases, their impact on clinical outcomes is limited and they may not be readily available in resource-limited settings. Traditional management using antimicrobials has been proposed but there is limited discussion about managing unique presentations such as renal failure in Babesiosis. Hence, understanding the pathophysiology, early recognition and aggressive treatment strategies can optimise clinical outcomes and reduce mortality.

  • haematology (incl blood transfusion)
  • infectious diseases
  • acute renal failure

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Footnotes

  • X @Saad_MalikMD

  • Contributors The following authors were responsible for drafting of the text, sourcing and editing of clinical images, investigation results, drawing original diagrams and algorithms and critical revision for important intellectual content. MH contributed to conceptualisation, drafting of the text, sourcing and editing of clinical images, investigation results, drawing original diagrams and algorithms, writing–original/revised drafts and writing–review and editing. NB contributed to conceptualisation, drafting of the text, sourcing and editing of clinical images, investigation results, drawing original diagrams and algorithms, writing–original/revised drafts, writing–review and editing. NS contributed to conceptualisation, drafting of the text, sourcing and editing of clinical images, investigation results, drawing original diagrams and algorithms, writing–original/revised drafts, writing–review and editing. MSM contributed to involved in drafting of the text, editing of clinical images, drawing original diagrams and algorithms, writing–review and editing. MH, NB, NS and MSM gave final approval of the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.