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Hypokalaemia associated with excessive cola-flavoured drinks consumption
  1. Sara Baba-Aissa1,
  2. Lynn Cooke2,
  3. Victoria Alner3 and
  4. Mohamed H Ahmed3,4,5
    1. 1The Medical School, University of Buckingham, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, UK
    2. 2Department of Medicine, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK
    3. 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK
    4. 4Department of Medicine and HIV Metabolic Clinic, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK
    5. 5Honorary Senior Lecturer of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Buckingham, Buckingham, UK
    1. Correspondence to Dr Mohamed H Ahmed; Mohamed.Hassan-Ahmed{at}mkuh.nhs.uk

    Abstract

    We present a case involving a male patient in his 30s who was admitted to hospital due to recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia over the past 5 years. His medical history revealed hypertension, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, and paranoia. He was taking citalopram, ramipril, amlodipine, and pramipexole. Tests indicated normal levels of aldosterone/renin ratio and plasma metanephrines. On reviewing his dietary history, it was noted that he consumed 3 to 3.5 L of cola-flavoured drinks on a daily basis. Normal potassium levels were achieved after a significant reduction in cola-flavoured drinks intake and potassium replacement. Subsequent outpatient clinic follow-up revealed that normal potassium levels were maintained even after the patient ceased taking potassium replacement tablets. Given the rarity of hypokalaemia associated with fizzy drinks, the underlying mechanism for this association remains unclear. In this case report, we attempt to provide a possible explanation for the involved mechanisms.

    • Hypertension
    • Endocrine system
    • Metabolic disorders
    • Diet
    • Renal system

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    Footnotes

    • Contributors The following authors were responsible for drafting of the text, sourcing and editing of clinical images, investigation results, drawing original diagrams and algorithms, and critical revision for important intellectual content. SBA: led the manuscript preparation, conducted the literature search, led the data analysis, and drafted the manuscript. LC: contributed in writing and revision of the article and approval of the final version. VA: contributed in writing and revision of the article and approval of the final version. MHA: conception and design, overall integrity of the article, writing and revision of the article and approval of the final version. The following authors gave final approval of the manuscript: SBA, LC, VA, MHA.

    • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

    • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

    • Competing interests None declared.

    • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.