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Laparoscopic myomectomy to facilitate laparoscopic resection of a bleeding interstitial ectopic pregnancy
  1. Anna Alexandra McDougall1,
  2. Schahrazed Rouabhi1,
  3. Zwelihe Magama2 and
  4. Funlayo Odejinmi2
  1. 1Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Anna Alexandra McDougall; anna.mcdougall{at}nhs.net

Abstract

Interstitial pregnancies present a diagnostic and management challenge and are associated with significant bleeding risk. We present a case of an interstitial ectopic pregnancy where there was a diagnostic delay due to the presence of uterine fibroids and where a laparoscopic myomectomy was required in order to perform laparoscopic resection of the ruptured interstitial pregnancy.

This case demonstrates the possibilities at laparoscopy for ectopic pregnancy, highlights the benefit of a structured ‘buddy’ system between gynaecology surgeons and brings attention to the paucity of literature on the unique management challenges of ectopic pregnancy in the presence of leiomyoma.

  • Pregnancy
  • Reproductive medicine

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Footnotes

  • Contributors AAM wrote the article. SR edited the article. ZM acquired the patient data and contributed to the literature review. FO supervised and edited the article.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.