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Diagnosing a nocturnal eating disorder in an average-weight man
  1. Arthur Arcaz1,
  2. Natalie White1 and
  3. Asefa Jejaw Mekonnen2
  1. 1Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia, USA
  2. 2Sleep Medicine, Rockville Internal Medicine Group, Rockville, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Arthur Arcaz; aca93{at}georgetown.edu

Abstract

A middle-aged man of average weight presented to the sleep medicine clinic for multiple episodes of nocturnal eating during night-time awakenings for the past several months. His symptoms were more characteristic of night eating syndrome rather than sleep-related eating disorder because of his recollection of the eating episodes and intake of edible substances during these episodes. He was treated with a low dose of sertraline with an initial improvement of symptoms followed by a relapse that was controlled with an increased dose. A year after initiation of therapy, his symptoms have resolved.

  • Eating disorders
  • Drugs: psychiatry
  • Sleep disorders (respiratory medicine)

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Footnotes

  • Contributors AA and NW helped with drafting and reviewing the manuscript. AJM was involved in reviewing the manuscript and managing the patient.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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