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Synchronous contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis in a recurrent breast cancer following previous axillary clearance
  1. Ian Y Goh and
  2. Emilia L Dauway
  1. Department of Surgery, Hervey Bay Hospital, Pialba, Queensland, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ian Y Goh; ian.goh{at}uqconnect.edu.au

Abstract

Ipsilateral axillary lymph node metastasis is common, while contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis (CAM) is uncommon. This report is of a patient that presented with a recurrence of left breast cancer and synchronous CAM, with a distant history of left breast conserving surgery and axillary dissection for invasive carcinoma. The CAM was confirmed following a non-routine lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. This highlights the possibility of CAM representing as locoregional disease rather than advanced stage IV disease.

  • Breast cancer
  • Breast surgery
  • General surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Both authors, IYG and ELD, have made substantial contribution to the following manuscript: 'Synchronous contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis in a recurrent breast cancer following previous axillary clearance'. The contributions are as follows: 1. Initial conception: IYG and ELD. 2. Design of work, acquisition of data and analysis and initial draft: IYD. 3. Interpretation of data and revision of draft for critically for important intellectual content: IYG and ELD. 4. Final approval of version published: IYG and ELD. 5. Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved: IYG and ELD.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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