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BK virus associated with small cell carcinoma of bladder in a patient with renal transplant
  1. Samantha J Loria1,
  2. Nabiya N Siddiqui2,
  3. Joy M Gary3,
  4. Julu Bhatnagar3,
  5. Brigid C Bollweg3,
  6. Basem Ahmed4 and
  7. Charles S Berenson2,5
  1. 1Department of Internal Medicine, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
  2. 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
  3. 3Infectious Diseases Pathology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  4. 4Department of Pathology, VA Western New York Healthcare System, Buffalo, New York, USA
  5. 5Division of Infectious Diseases, VA Western New York Healthcare System, Buffalo, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Charles S Berenson; berenson{at}buffalo.edu

Abstract

A man in his 70s with a complex medical history, including cadaveric renal transplant, presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. Investigation revealed recurrent urinary pathogens, including Enterobacter cloacae and persistent BK viruria. Cystoscopy revealed a pedunculated mass in the right posterior–lateral wall, inferior to the transplant urethral orifice, and biopsy of this mass showed invasive small cell carcinoma with a prominent adenocarcinoma component. The tumour was treated with complete transurethral resection followed by carboplatin, etoposide and radiation. Laboratory analysis of biopsied samples showed immunostaining and molecular evidence of BK virus DNA in the cancer cells. Follow-up cystoscopies have shown no recurrence of the cancer.

  • Malignant disease and immunosuppression
  • Infections
  • Urological cancer
  • Carcinogenesis

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SJL and NNS: primary research and authorship of the manuscript. JMG: conception, design and interpretation of immunohistochemical and molecular studies. JB, BCB and BA: performance and interpretation of histopathological studies. CSB: conception, design, acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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