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Mutation of the MYL3 gene in a patient with mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  1. Akash Mavilakandy1 and
  2. Hisham Ahamed2
  1. 1Department of General Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK
  2. 2Department of Cardiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Cochin, Kerala, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Akash Mavilakandy; am1138{at}leicester.ac.uk

Abstract

In this study, we discuss a female patient referred to cardiology with left ventricular hypertrophy at mid-ventricular segments resulting in a mid-cavitary obstruction and a left ventricular apical aneurysm. The patient had normal epicardial coronary arteries, but presented with recurrent cerebrovascular events. The patient had a positive family history for sudden cardiac death. Cardiac MRI detected positive features of left ventricular mid-cavity obstruction, left ventricular apical aneurysm and delayed gadolinium enhancement, with Holter monitoring assessment displaying segments of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Genetic analysis detected an myosin light chain 3 (MYL3) gene mutation. The patient will be referred to receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

The MYL3 gene mutation is a rare variant in patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. To our knowledge, the presence of a left ventricular apical aneurysm has not been previously reported in literature concerning the MYL3 gene mutation. The presence of this abnormality further increases the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  • cardiovascular medicine
  • arrhythmias
  • genetics
  • genetic screening / counselling

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Footnotes

  • Contributors AM—wrote and reviewed the case report. HA—wrote and reviewed the case report.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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