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Myocardial ischaemia secondary to ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm
  1. Ben Li1,
  2. Vikramaditya Prabhudesai2,
  3. Mark Wheatcroft1 and
  4. Mohammad Qadura1,3
  1. 1Division of Vascular Surgery, St. Michael’s Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  2. 2Division of Interventional Radiology, St. Michael’s Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  3. 3Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mohammad Qadura; mohammad.qadura{at}utoronto.ca

Abstract

A 63-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with presyncope, back pain, hypotension and inferior ST segment elevations. He received aspirin, ticagrelor and heparin and was transferred to our institution as a Code STEMI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction). A coronary angiogram demonstrated multivessel disease but no occlusive lesion for acute intervention. The following day, he developed worsening abdominal/back pain. A CT angiogram (CTA) showed a ruptured infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. He underwent urgent percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair. CTA on postoperative day (POD) 10 demonstrated a patent stent graft with no endoleak. The patient was discharged on POD 12 in stable condition.

  • interventional cardiology
  • ischaemic heart disease
  • healthcare improvement and patient safety
  • interventional radiology
  • vascular surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Conceptualisation, methodology, validation, formal analysis, investigation, resources, data curation, writing—review and editing: BL, VP, MW, MQ; software: BL, VP; writing—original draft preparation: BL; visualisation: VP; supervision: MQ; project administration: MQ; funding acquisition: MQ. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Case reports provide a valuable learning resource for the scientific community and can indicate areas of interest for future research. They should not be used in isolation to guide treatment choices or public health policy.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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