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Iatrogenic intrathoracic encapsulated siliconoma from a ruptured breast implant
  1. Christina Shree Chopra1,2,
  2. Patricia Thistlethwaite3,
  3. Fernando Herrera4 and
  4. Ahmed Suliman2
  1. 1 School of Medicine, California University of Science & Medicine, Colton, CA, USA
  2. 2 Division of Plastic Surgery, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
  3. 3 Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
  4. 4 Division of Plastic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
  1. Correspondence to Ms Christina Shree Chopra; csc376{at}nyu.edu

Abstract

Our patient was a 57-year-old woman with a history of bilateral retropectoral silicone breast augmentation and axillary hyperhidrosis who underwent a bilateral thoracic sympathectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery by a surgeon at an outside hospital approximately 20 years ago. The left side required an open thoracotomy. Shortly after the surgery, she developed a left-sided Baker 4 capsular contracture and the left implant was noted to be ruptured. Both implants were exchanged. Several years later the patient began to experience progressive fatigue. Work-up revealed a left lung nodule and she underwent a biopsy that confirmed silicone granulomas. It was hypothesised that at the time of her initial thoracotomy the implant was violated resulting in silicone spillage into the thoracic cavity. The patient was referred to our institution for advanced management of her intrathoracic silicosis. The patient underwent bilateral removal of her silicone implants, total capsulectomy and needle-localised removal of her left thoracic silicone masses. She had an uneventful postoperative course with resolution of her fatigue.

  • pathology
  • cardiothoracic surgery
  • plastic and reconstructive surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CSC: responsible for drafting the case report and conducting corresponding literature review on the clinical content discussed and gave final approval of the version to be published. PT: contributed to data collection and interpretation as a member of the patient’s clinical care team, conducted critical revisions of the article and gave final approval of the version to be published. FH: conducted critical revisions of the article and gave final approval of the version to be published. AS: responsible for conception and design of the work, as well as data collection and interpretation, conducted critical revisions of the article and gave final approval of the version to be published.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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