Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the cervix in pregnancy: the importance of multidisciplinary management
  1. Esme Bain1,
  2. Sarah Louise Coleridge2,3 and
  3. Jo Morrison2
  1. 1Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, Taunton, UK
  2. 2Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, Taunton, UK
  3. 3Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Jo Morrison; jo_morrison{at}doctors.org.uk

Abstract

A woman in her mid-20s presented with bleeding at 18 weeks gestation from a cervical ‘polyp’. Histopathology demonstrated a rare small cell neuroendocrine of the cervix. There were only 18 cases of neuroendocrine tumours of the cervix in and around pregnancy in the literature, so the evidence base for treatment was scarce. She was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, using a regimen used for small cell neuroendocrine tumours of the lung, to allow for fetal lung maturity. Disease initially responded, then progressed and she was delivered at 32 weeks by caesarean radical hysterectomy. Adjuvant treatment included further chemotherapy and radical pelvic radiotherapy. The woman and her child are doing well over 6 years after treatment, although the woman has significant side effects of both radical surgery and radiotherapy. This case emphasises the need for excellent communication between multidisciplinary professionals, patients and their families and using external colleagues to help with rare clinical problems.

  • gynecological cancer
  • cervical cancer
  • obstetrics and gynaecology
  • malignant disease and immunosuppression
  • obstetrics
  • gynaecology and fertility

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Twitter @DrJoMorrison1

  • Contributors JM had the original idea to write the case report. EB, SLC and JM wrote and edited the report and approved the final version.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.