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Fracture of heterotopic mass in the lower limb: surgical case report and review of the literature
  1. Joshua W Thompson1,2,
  2. Ricci Plastow1,2,
  3. Matthew Rogers3 and
  4. Fares S Haddad1,2
  1. 1Orthopaedic Department, Princess Grace Hospital, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  3. 3Medicine & Performance Team, Peterborough United Football Club, Peterborough, UK
  1. Correspondence to Joshua W Thompson; joshua.thompson{at}doctors.org.uk

Abstract

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a rare sequela of sports injuries with a predominance in young active males located within bulky muscle planes. In most cases it is self-limiting and spontaneous resolution can occur. Fractures of HO are sparsely reported within the literature. We present a rare case of a professional athlete with a recurrent fracture of mature HO within the deep fascial plane between the anterior and posterior thigh compartments. The heterotopic mass and associated fracture had restricted return to sport and thus necessitated surgical management. The athlete successfully returned to sport following surgical excision with postoperative medical therapy to inhibit recurrence.

  • orthopaedics
  • hamstring
  • orthopaedic and trauma surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JWT wrote and edited the manuscript. RP prepared and edited the manuscript. MR supervised athlete rehabilitation and edited the manuscript. FSH performed surgery, conducted patient follow-up and supervised manuscript synthesis.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.