Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Simultaneous acute myocardial infarction, stroke and critical limb ischaemia: an unusual presentation requiring multidisciplinary approach
  1. Danielle Lee Simpson
  1. Foundation Programme, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Danielle Lee Simpson; danielle.simpson7{at}nhs.net

Abstract

We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented overnight to a district general hospital as a primary percutaneous coronary intervention alert for an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction. On presentation to cardiac catheterisation lab, he had ongoing chest pain but began to complain of left-sided limb weakness and pain in his right leg. He was found to have dense hemiparesis on examination with an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale of 8 and an absent right femoral pulse. During the procedure, his common iliac arteries were imaged showing a complete occlusion of his right common iliac. After stenting the culprit lesion in his right coronary artery, he was transferred to a different hospital within the trust where he could receive thrombolysis for his stroke. Unfortunately, after thrombolysis, he went on to develop haemorrhagic transformation of his stroke and an upper gastrointestinal bleed with prolonged recovery of his neurological symptoms after a 27-day hospital stay; but CT arterial imaging showed resolution of right common iliac occlusion predischarge. Here, we discuss the best possible approach to management with simultaneous thrombotic events.

  • ischaemic heart disease
  • medical management
  • stroke
  • radiology (diagnostics)

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors GWH: provided general supervision and support, technical editing, language editing and proofreading as well as assistance in acquisition of images.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.