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Tongue: the unusual site in malignant pleural mesothelioma
  1. Iskandar Zulqarnain bin Mohamed1,
  2. Matthew Idle2,
  3. Timothy Bates3 and
  4. Sundus Yahya4
  1. 1Department of Healthcare for Older People, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  3. 3Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  4. 4The Cancer Centre, Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sundus Yahya; sundus.yahya{at}uhb.nhs.uk

Abstract

Malignant mesotheliomas (MMs) are malignancies of the mesothelium, with primary deposits originating in the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium and the tunica vaginalis (ie, testicular). Metastatic spread is commonly reported to affect the liver, adrenal glands, kidney and contralateral lung (in cases of malignant pleural mesothelioma). Metastases to distant sites are uncommon. Spread to the oral cavity in particular is very rare. A total of 23 cases of metastatic spread to the oral cavity have been reported in the literature to date; of those, 9 cases have been to the tongue. Given the rarity of the site of metastasis, the management remains challenging. This case highlights a rare site of metastasis in MM, discusses treatment options available and briefly talks about technical limitations in treating a mobile structure such as the tongue. Good palliative and supportive care is crucial in managing cases where no curative treatment is possible.

  • lung cancer (oncology)
  • mouth
  • oral and maxillofacial surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors IZbM drafted the initial case report and discussion. MI obtained the biopsy, provided photographs and offered expert opinion regarding sections within the report pertaining to oral and maxillofacial surgery. TB completed the histological and immunohistochemical assessment, and offered expert opinion regarding sections of the report related to histology and immunohistochemisty. SY was the clinician who assessed and managed the patient in clinic, provided oversight for the report and was heavily involved in revising sections of the case report. All authors reviewed all sections of the case report and suggested corrections/amendments prior to submission.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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