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Recurrent macroglossia requiring tracheostomy after haemorrhagic basal ganglia stroke
  1. Muyinat Y Osoba1,
  2. Alexander L Schneider1,
  3. Borislav Alexiev2 and
  4. Akihiro J Matsuoka1,3,4
  1. 1Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  2. 2Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  3. 3Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA
  4. 4Hugh Knowles Center for Hearing Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Akihiro J Matsuoka; amatsuok{at}nm.org

Abstract

A 50-year-old African American woman with hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease and prior cerebral vascular accident was transferred from an outside hospital after being found unresponsive and subsequently intubated for severe orolingual swelling. Imaging showed left thalamic haemorrhagic stroke, and the lingual swelling was clinically concerning for angio-oedema, with which a lingual biopsy was consistent. Work-up was negative for hereditary or acquired angio-oedema, and imaging was negative for structural causes. Of note, the patient had an episode of severe orolingual swelling 3 months prior to this presentation after suffering left thalamic haemorrhage which self-resolved after approximately 2 months. In both episodes lingual swelling predated receipt of tissue plasminogen activator and she had discontinued ACE inhibitor therapy since her first episode of tongue swelling. Despite medical and supportive management, tongue swelling progressed during admission and the decision was made to allow the patient’s tongue swelling to self-resolve.

  • stroke
  • otolaryngology / ENT
  • oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • dentistry and oral medicine
  • head and neck surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MYO: conduct, reporting, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data. AS: planning, conception and design, analysis and interpretation of data. BA: acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data. AJM: planning, conception and design, analysis and interpretation of data.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Next of kin consent obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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