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Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a patient with status epilepticus: a rare association
  1. Sudheer Tale1,
  2. Mrudula Kolli1,
  3. Kesari Masaipeta2 and
  4. Gautam Vinay Kumar Budumuri3
  1. 1Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, AIIMS Rishikesh, Rishikesh, India
  2. 2Critical Care Medicine, AIIMS Rishikesh, Rishikesh, India
  3. 3Department of Internal Medicine, AIIMS Rishikesh, Rishikesh, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sudheer Tale; drtalesudheer{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Hyponatraemia is one of the most common and serious electrolyte abnormalities in patients with neurological diseases. Assessing the intravascular fluid status, urine sodium, urine and serum osmolality helps to narrow down the differential diagnosis. Differentiation between cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS), diabetes insipidus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion is absolutely necessary for correct management of hyponatraemia in this group of patients. In this case report, we have presented a 46-year-old gentleman who was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) with status epilepticus and developed hyponatraemia during course of his ICU stay, diagnosed as CSWS and managed with normal saline and fludrocortisone. His serum sodium gradually improved, consciousness was regained and later shifted to general ward on antiepileptic treatment.

  • epilepsy and seizures
  • adult intensive care

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Footnotes

  • Contributors ST: Concepts, design, intellectual content, literature search, data processing, manuscript preparation and manuscript review. MK: Concepts, design, intellectual content, literature search, data processing, manuscript preparation and manuscript review. KM: Concepts, design, literature search, data processing and manuscript preparation. GVKB: Concepts, design, intellectual content, literature search and manuscript review.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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