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Intravenous lobular capillary haemangioma presenting as neck discomfort associated with neck anteflexion
  1. Kotaro Ikeda1,
  2. Toshihisa Ichiba2,
  3. Kazunori Seo2 and
  4. Yuji Okazaki3
  1. 1Internal Medicine, Hiroshima City Hiroshima Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  2. 2Emergency Medicine, Hiroshima City Hiroshima Citizens Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  3. 3Internal Medicine, Akiota Hospital, Yamagata-gun, Hiroshima, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Yuji Okazaki; ur8nibhc1{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Lobular capillary haemangioma, also known as pyogenic granuloma, is a benign vascular tumour that usually originates in the skin and mucosal membrane. It sometimes derives from the lumen of a vein and the clinical presentations are various and non-specific. A 72-year-old woman complained of a sensation of pressure in her left neck for 1 month when cooking. Her left cephalic vein was enlarged with no signs of oedema, and cervical ultrasound revealed a space-occupying lesion in the left subclavian vein. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI revealed an intravascular tumour. This tumour was removed with operation, and histopathological examination revealed intravascular capillary haemangioma. Intravascular lobular capillary haemangioma is a rare condition that occurs in the veins of the neck and upper extremities. Intravascular tumours could cause a unique symptom, such as neck discomfort associated with neck anteflexion.

  • haemangioma
  • cardiothoracic surgery
  • ultrasonography

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors contributed to the development of this manuscript. KI was responsible for the literature search and writing of all manuscripts. TI, KS and YO were supervisors.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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