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Case report
Multiple splenic infarcts: unusual presentation of hereditary spherocytosis associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus infection
  1. Aye Mon Thida1,
  2. Ifeanyi Ilonzo1 and
  3. Pouyan Gohari2
  1. 1Department of Medicine, Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA
  2. 2Hematology and Oncology Department, Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Aye Mon Thida; ayemonthida.dr{at}gmail.com

Abstract

A 19-year-old African American woman presented to the emergency department with a history of left upper quadrant pain for a week, associated with nausea, malaise, loss of appetite, subjective fevers and chills. Her family history is significant for thalassemia in her maternal aunt, and hereditary spherocytosis in her brother, sister and cousin. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed massive splenomegaly and multiple splenic infarcts. On the second day of admission, she developed a fever of 103°F. Further evaluation revealed acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and hereditary spherocytosis. Her condition improved after 4 days on piperacillin/tazobactam, intravenous fluids, analgesics and antipyretics. Our case report describes a thorough clinical evaluation of a patient with fever, anaemia, massive splenomegaly and multiple splenic infarcts. It highlights the need for careful interpretation of multiple positive IgM results on viral serological testing that often accompanies acute EBV infections.

  • haematology (incl blood transfusion)
  • infectious diseases
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Footnotes

  • Contributors AMT acquired the data from the patient’s electronic medical records, obtained the patient consent and authored the manuscript. II acquired the data from the patient’s electronic medical records and edited the manuscript. PG was instrumental in the guidance and editing of the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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