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Case report
Splenic injury: a rare complication of lower endoscopy
  1. Beatriz Cathala Esberard1 and
  2. Michael Mohseni2
  1. 1Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic’s Campus in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA
  2. 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic’s Campus in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Michael Mohseni; mohseni.michael{at}mayo.edu

Abstract

Splenic injury after colonoscopy is a rare (1:100 000) but serious complication after colonoscopy associated with high morbidity. Consequences range from a mild, self-limited splenic haematoma to the catastrophic shattered spleen and haemorrhagic shock. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman reporting to the emergency department with abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Abdominal CT with intravenous contrast showed a grade I splenic laceration with no active bleeding and a small amount of free fluid collected in the pelvis. General Surgery and Hospitalist Service recommended conservative measures. She was discharged 1 day later with normal haemodynamics and adequate pain control. In conclusion, patients with postcolonoscopy complications often seek evaluation in the emergency department; splenic injury must be considered in the differential. The significant morbidity and occasional mortality are reported from spleen injury after colonoscopy; therefore, the treating physician should promptly evaluate and treat this condition (with appropriate specialty consultation) to prevent untoward outcomes.

  • endoscopy
  • emergency medicine
  • gastrointestinal surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MM: evaluated and treated the patient; also performed significant manuscript editing. BCE: performed literature review and manuscript drafting.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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