Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Case report
Persistent sore throat: a case of laryngeal mucous membrane pemphigoid
  1. Sarah Law1,2,
  2. Jeni Pillai1 and
  3. Chris Burgess1
  1. 1Otolaryngology, Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton, Somerset, UK
  2. 2Health and Social Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
  1. Correspondence to Sarah Law; sarahlaw17{at}gmail.com

Abstract

We present a case of a 72-year-old women who presented with a persistent sore throat and productive cough. On flexible nasendoscopy examination, she was found to have a fairly superficial ulcer affecting the laryngeal surface and tip of her epiglottis. On her second microlaryngoscopy and biopsy, direct immunofluorescent staining of the biopsy was analysed and the histological findings were in keeping with a diagnosis of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP). MMP is a rare chronic autoimmune condition characterised by the presence of blistering subepithelial lesions that can cause scarring. Laryngeal MMP affects only 1 in 10 million people and can lead to life-threatening airway compromise arising from scarring and stenosis. As there is a large spectrum of disease, it is important to adopt a multidisciplinary approach including dermatologists, otolaryngologists and ophthalmologists for prompt diagnosis and early recognition of potential complications, maximising functional outcomes for patients.

  • ear, nose and throat
  • ear, nose and throat/otolaryngology
  • medical management
  • ophthalmology
  • dermatology
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors SL drafted the case report, edited and reviewed the literature review. JP drafted the literature review and reviewed the case report. CB obtained the diagnosis, and reviewed the article for submission. All authors reviewed the final article before final submission.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.