Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Case report
Successful pregnancy in a liver transplant patient of Budd-Chiari syndrome
  1. Rubina Sohail1,2,
  2. Alia Bashir2,
  3. Zara Safdar2 and
  4. Asifa Noreen3
  1. 1Obstetrics & Gyunaecology, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
  2. 2Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
  3. 3Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Services Hospital, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
  1. Correspondence to Professor Rubina Sohail; rubina95{at}gmail.com

Abstract

In recent years, the number of patients undergoing liver transplant has increased. Successful transplant has resulted in better quality of life and improved fertility in younger women. This is a case study a 31-year-old woman, who had history of Budd-Chiari syndrome and underwent liver transplantation in 2014 with uneventful postoperative course. She was clinically stable on tablet tacrolimus and coumarin with no episode of allograft rejection since transplantation. The patient conceived spontaneously, after 4 years of transplant and during pregnancy, she was managed by multidisciplinary team. During the initial period, the graft and pregnancy continued without complications. However, at 33 weeks, the patient presented with sluggish fetal movements, amniotic fluid index of 3.4 and SD ratio of 3.31 for which she underwent caesarean section. She delivered a healthy female baby of 1.4 kg. This case study concludes that vigilant monitoring of fetal growth is pivotal for optimal fetal outcome.

  • transplantation
  • pregnancy
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Twitter @rubinasohail@rubinasohail

  • Contributors RS and AN: manuscript writing. AB and ZS: case management and writing manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.