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Prosopagnosia seizure semiology in a 10-year-old boy: a functional neuroimaging study
  1. Jack Lam1,
  2. Jeremy T Moreau1,
  3. Jen-Kai Chen2,3,
  4. Steffen Albrecht4,
  5. Christine Saint-Martin5,
  6. Elisabeth Simard-Tremblay6,
  7. Sylvain Baillet1,3,7,
  8. Denise Klein2,3 and
  9. Roy WR Dudley8
  1. 1McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  2. 2Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3McGill University, Centre for Research on Brain Language and Music, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  4. 4Department of Pathology, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  5. 5Department of Radiology, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  6. 6Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  7. 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  8. 8Department of Pediatric Surgery, Neurosurgery Division, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Roy WR Dudley; dudleyrwr{at}gmail.com

Abstract

We illustrate a case of post-traumatic recurrent transient prosopagnosia in a paediatric patient with a right posterior inferior temporal gyrus haemorrhage seen on imaging and interictal electroencephalogram abnormalities in the right posterior quadrant. Face recognition area mapping with magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional MRI (fMRI) was performed to clarify the relationship between the lesion and his prosopagnosia, which showed activation of the right fusiform gyrus that colocalised with the lesion. Lesions adjacent to the right fusiform gyrus can result in seizures presenting as transient prosopagnosia. MEG and fMRI can help to attribute this unique semiology to the lesion.

  • epilepsy and seizures
  • neuroimaging
  • neurosurgery
  • paediatric surgery

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JL and RWRD conceptualised the study, collected/interpreted the combined data and contributed to significantly drafting the manuscript and creating the figures. JM and SB designed, performed and analysed the magnetoencephalography (MEG) facial recognition task. ESM analysed the EEG that was performed concomitantly with the MEG to look for interictal epileptiform discharges. CSM performed and analysed the high-resolution MRI to look for a cavernous malformation versus traumatic contusion. SA performed exhaustive examination of the pathological specimens to rule out a cavernous malformation. JKC and DK designed, performed and analysed the functional magnetic resonance imaging facial recognition task. All authors contributed significantly to data acquisition/analysis and drafted/revised and approved of the final version of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was funded by Foundation of the Department of Neurosurgery, McGill University, grant number: (Charitable Registration No: 73954 0920 RR 0001).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Parental/guardian consent obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.