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Metastasis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma to the stomach: a rare entity
  1. Marica Reise-Filteau1,
  2. Michael Carter2,
  3. Ryan DeCoste2 and
  4. Ali Kohansal1
  1. 1Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Care & Endoscopy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  2. 2Department of Pathology, Division of Anatomical Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ali Kohansal; kohansal{at}ualberta.ca

Abstract

Metastatic spread of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) to the gastrointestinal tract is a rare entity. A 63-year-old woman with a history of poorly controlled HIV and a recurrent cSCC on the right temple presented with functional decline, ascites and shortness of breath. A CT scan showed widespread metastatic malignancy involving lung, pleura, heart, stomach, liver, retroperitoneum and soft-tissue. In the case presented here, an upper endoscopy revealed a submucosal lesion in the stomach. Biopsies described the lesion as a poorly differentiated SCC. Comprehensive genomic profiling yielded striking molecular similarities between the gastric tumour and the patient’s prior cSCC. It confirmed the origin of the disease and excluded spread from an occult primary. This case adds to the limited literature on gastrointestinal metastases of cSCC and serves as a reminder that non-AIDS-defining cancers are on the rise in the HIV-population.

  • skin cancer
  • stomach and duodenum
  • HIV / AIDS

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Footnotes

  • MR-F and MC are joint first authors.

  • Contributors MR-F: planning, reporting, conception, acquisition of data and interpretation of data for the manuscript. MC: planning, reporting, conception, acquisition of data and interpretation of data for the manuscript. RD: planning, reporting, conception, acquisition of data and interpretation of data for the manuscript. AK: planning, reporting, conception, acquisition of data and interpretation of data for the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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