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Clozapine in the management of persistent destructive behaviour in a 17-year-old boy with intellectual disability
  1. Navin Dadlani1,2,
  2. Jacqueline Small3,
  3. Jean Starling4,5 and
  4. Stewart Einfeld6
  1. 1The University of Sydney Brain and Mind Research Institute, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
  3. 3Croydon Health Centre, Croydon, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4Concord Centre for Mental Health, Concord, New South Wales, Australia
  5. 5Discipline of Psychiatry, The University of Sydney Sydney Medical School, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  6. 6The University of Sydney Brain and Mind Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Navin Dadlani; navin.dadlani{at}sydney.edu.au

Abstract

The management of challenging and refractory destructive behaviour in young patients with intellectual disability (ID) is a major issue faced by families, carers and healthcare professionals who support them. Often, paediatricians and psychiatrists use various behavioural and psychopharmacological approaches, including polypharmacy. We report on one such patient who benefitted greatly from a trial of clozapine, resulting in less aggression, improved quality of life and potentially huge cost savings. We conclude that clozapine may represent a beneficial though seldom-used option for severe, destructive behaviour in young people with ID.

  • developmental paediatrocs
  • child and adolescent psychiatry
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Footnotes

  • Contributors ND contributed to conception, planning, collection and interpretation of data, manuscript drafting and final approval of the manuscript. JSmall contributed to conception, planning, manuscript drafting and final approval of the manuscript. JStarling contributed to planning, collection and interpretation of data, manuscript drafting and final approval of the manuscript. SE contributed to conception, planning, collection and interpretation of data, manuscript drafting and final approval of the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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