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CASE REPORT
An EBV+ lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma in a young woman with chronic hepatitis B
  1. Sofia V Gearty1,
  2. Ayman Al Jurdi2,
  3. Meredith E Pittman3 and
  4. Renuka Gupta4
  1. 1 Cornell University Joan and Sanford I Weill Medical College, New York, New York, USA
  2. 2 Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  3. 3 Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  4. 4 Internal Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Ms Sofia V Gearty, sog2009{at}med.cornell.edu

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is implicated in the tumorigenesis of a variety of malignancies, including Burkitt’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). EBV+ lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma (LELCC) is a rare type of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with a distinct pathology and poorly understood treatment options. Morphologically, this neoplasm resembles undifferentiated NPC, a commonly EBV+ tumour with a prominent lymphoid infiltrate. Almost all of the current literature regarding LELCC describes early stage tumours that are treated surgically and achieve good outcomes. In contrast, this report documents a late stage LELCC treated unsuccessfully with systemic chemotherapy.

  • oncology
  • pathology
  • immunology
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Footnotes

  • Contributors SVG conducted the analysis of the case, literature review and wrote the manuscript. AAJ contributed to the analysis of the case, revision of the manuscript and provided figure 1. MEP conducted the pathological analysis, provided figure 2, and contributed to revision of the manuscript. RG conceived the design of the paper and contributed to the analysis of the case and revision of the manuscript.

  • Funding SVG was supported by a Medical Scientist Training Program grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under award number T32GM007739 to the Weill Cornell/Rockefeller/Sloan Kettering Tri-Institutional MD-PhD Program.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

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