Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Case report
Psychiatric symptoms post intensive care unit admission
  1. Katherine Elizabeth Triplett1,
  2. Andrew Ford2,3 and
  3. Matthew Anstey1,3
  1. 1Intensive Care, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  2. 2WA Centre for Health & Ageing, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
  3. 3Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Katherine Elizabeth Triplett; katherine.vautin{at}health.wa.gov.au

Abstract

A 53-year-old woman was admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) with acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe community-acquired pneumonia that necessitated maximum supportive care with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Her medical history included bipolar disorder on quetiapine and sertraline, as well as a previous ICU admission, approximately 2 years prior, for non-cirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy that was complicated by prolonged post discharge anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms, consistent with post-intensive-care syndrome. Here, we present a case, and explore the outcomes for a patient who had two separate admissions with life-threatening illnesses, but had distinct differences in the psychological outcomes following each illness.

  • adult intensive care
  • psychiatry (drugs and medicines)
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors KET was responsible for identification of the case, the review of the literature, drafting of the manuscript and for approving the final version. AF was responsible for revising the manuscript critically and for approving the final version. MA was responsible for identification of the case, revising the manuscript critically and approving the final version.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.