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CASE REPORT
Rectal adenocarcinoma presenting with thigh muscle metastasis as the only metastatic site
  1. Abtin Doroudinia1,
  2. Payam Mehrian2,
  3. Atosa Dorudinia3 and
  4. Fatemeh Kaghazchi4
  1. 1 PET/CT, Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, The Islamic Republic of Iran
  2. 2 Radiology, Telemedicine Research Center (TRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, The Islamic Republic of Iran
  3. 3 Pathology, Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Masih Daneshvari Hospital. Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, The Islamic Republic of Iran
  4. 4 PET/CT, Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, The Islamic Republic of Iran
  1. Correspondence to Dr Abtin Doroudinia, abtin1354{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Rectal carcinoma with metastasis to skeletal muscle is a rare finding. According to literature review, 17 cases of skeletal muscle metastasis from colorectal carcinoma have been documented where only six cases were rectal carcinomas.

We discuss a case of a middle-aged man with a known history of high-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum, status post abdominoperineal resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. During the planned chemotherapy course, a right proximal thigh subcutaneous mass was incidentally found which on subsequent biopsy proved to be metastatic from rectal primary site. On subsequent 18F-FDG (Fluorodeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan after completion of chemotherapy for the purpose of treatment response evaluation, only FDG-avid lesion was residual right proximal thigh metastatic mass without involvement of other common sites, such as liver and lung. In this case, the 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan was able to exclude additional metastatic sites and also evaluate the patient’s treatment response.

  • colon cancer
  • radiology
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Footnotes

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Contributors AbD: initial project concept, manuscript drafting, final edition and approval. PM: assistance in edition, review of radiology images, proof reading. AtD: pathology review, proofreading. FK: manuscript revision.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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