Article Text

Download PDFPDF
CASE REPORT
Hypocalcaemia and hyponatraemia masquerading the diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome
  1. Bhargav Gopinath,
  2. Nupur Chauhan and
  3. Basavaprabhu Achappa
  1. Medicine, Kasturba Medical College Mangalore Affiliated to Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Basavaprabhu Achappa, bachu1504{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Gitelman syndrome is the most common renal tubulopathy, recently exhibiting a dramatic rise of incidence in Asia.

A 50-year-old woman presented with vomiting, fatigue and quadriparesis. Physical examination revealed a positive Trousseau sign , hypotonia and areflexia.

Suspecting hypocalcaemia, she was given intravenous 10% calcium gluconate (10 mL administered slowly over 10 min) but her manifestations persisted. An exhaustive laboratory work up revealed the diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome.

The peculiarity of this case however, is entailed in its coexistence with hypocalcaemia and hyponatraemia. In addition, the age of primary presentation being 50 years further culminates its atypicality.

Multiple electrolyte imbalances were corrected by oral and intravenous supplementation and a high sodium-potassium diet was advocated. Administration of spironolactone imposed a pitfall in the management of our patient due to exacerbation of pre-existing hyponatraemia.

On follow-up, her electrolyte profile was stable and corresponding symptoms were alleviated.

  • renal system
  • metabolic disorders dyselectrolytemia
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors BG: Contributions to the acquisition, analysis, interpretation of data and write up. Drafting. NC: Contributions to the acquisition, analysis, interpretation of data and write up. Drafting. BA: Contributions to the acquisition, analysis, interpretation of data and write up. Drafting and final approval.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.