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CASE REPORT
Pancoast tumour presenting as shoulder pain with Horner’s syndrome
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  • Published on:
    Pancost Tumor Epidemiology and Histology

    The terms Pancoast tumors, superior sulcus tumors, and superior pulmonary sulcus tumors are applied to neoplasms located at the apical pleuro pulmonary groove. In 1924, Henry K. Pancoast, described a patient afflicted with a lung carcinoma occupying the apical thoracic cavity that was associated with a constellation of symptoms that included shoulder pain radiating down the arm, atrophy of the hand muscles, and Horner’s syndrome.[ 1] Since then, it has become widely accepted that the term Pancoast syndrome can be applied to any clinical condition in which a neoplasm in the apex of a lung is accompanied by shoulder or arm pain. Anatomically, the definition includes any tumor invading through the parietal pleura at the level of the first rib and above. The pulmonary sulcus refers to the costo vertebral gutter extending from the first rib to the diaphragm. The superior pulmonary sulcus is therefore analogous to the superior most portion of this recess. The first rib is at the base of the thoracic inlet. The thoracic inlet contains the subclavian vein anteriorly, the subclavian artery, phrenic nerve and trunks of the brachial plexus medially, and the nerve roots of the brachial plexus and the stellate ganglion posteriorly. The bony thorax in the superior sulcus includes the upper ribs and the associated vertebral bodies. It is invasion of this complex anatomical area that accounts for the classic symptoms of the Pancoast tumor. Superior sulcus carcinomas have the same biologic...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Pancoast Tumor

    The terms Pancoast tumors, superior sulcus tumors, and superior pulmonary sulcus tumors are applied to neoplasms located at the apical pleuro pulmonary groove. In 1924, Henry K. Pancoast, described a patient afflicted with a lung carcinoma occupying the apical thoracic cavity that was associated with a constellation of symptoms that included shoulder pain radiating down the arm, atrophy of the hand muscles, and Horner’s syndrome.[ 1] Since then, it has become widely accepted that the term Pancoast syndrome can be applied to any clinical condition in which a neoplasm in the apex of a lung is accompanied by shoulder or arm pain. Anatomically, the definition includes any tumor invading through the parietal pleura at the level of the first rib and above. The pulmonary sulcus refers to the costo vertebral gutter extending from the first rib to the diaphragm. The superior pulmonary sulcus is therefore analogous to the superior most portion of this recess. The first rib is at the base of the thoracic inlet. The thoracic inlet contains the subclavian vein anteriorly, the subclavian artery, phrenic nerve and trunks of the brachial plexus medially, and the nerve roots of the brachial plexus and the stellate ganglion posteriorly. The bony thorax in the superior sulcus includes the upper ribs and the associated vertebral bodies. It is invasion of this complex anatomical area that accounts for the classic symptoms of the Pancoast tumor. Superior sulcus carcinomas have the same biologic...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.