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BMJ Case Reports 2018; doi:10.1136/bcr-2018-225202
  • Unusual association of diseases/symptoms
  • CASE REPORT

Massive faecal impaction leading to abdominal compartment syndrome and acute lower limb ischaemia

  1. Bill Fleming
  1. General and Endocrine Surgery, Footscray Hospital, Footscray, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Simon Ho, simho88{at}gmail.com
  • Accepted 25 May 2018
  • Published 20 June 2018

Summary

Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality requiring prompt treatment. We report a rare case of a 57-year-old man who developed acute lower limb ischaemia, severe metabolic acidosis and renal impairment from massive faecal impaction of unknown aetiology resulting in ACS causing occlusion of the right common iliac artery. This was treated with faecal disimpaction, which eventually resulted in slow but full recovery.

Footnotes

  • Contributors SH was responsible for drafting and writing the case report, and performing the literature review. RK contributed to the design of the work and revising the report. BF was responsible for the overall work and aspects within it.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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