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BMJ Case Reports 2017; doi:10.1136/bcr-2017-219661
  • CASE REPORT

Oesophageal cancer presenting as Lemierre’s syndrome caused by Streptococcus anginosus

  1. Ghassan Bachuwa1
  1. 1 Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan, USA
  2. 2 Infectious Disease, Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ghassan Bachuwa, gbachuw2{at}hurleymc.com
  • Accepted 30 March 2017
  • Published 17 April 2017

Summary

A 59-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complaints of dysphagia, right-sided neck swelling, fever and chills. Physical examination was remarkable for fever and tender swelling over the right side of the neck. Laboratory investigations revealed leucocytosis with neutrophilia. CT of the neck showed right internal jugular vein thrombosis with an overlying abscess and a nodular opacity in the right lung apex with air locules. He underwent surgical drainage of the neck abscess. Aerobic cultures from the drainage and blood cultures grew Streptococcus anginosus. Given his initial complaint of dysphagia, upper endoscopy was performed which showed a mass in the upper oesophagus. Histopathology confirmed squamous cell carcinoma. The patient received 6 weeks of antibiotics therapy.

Footnotes

  • Contributors MO: carried out the literature review, wrote the initial draft of the manuscript, revised it critically, collected the images, approved the final version to be published and made sure all the information presented in the manuscript was accurate. SH and GB: edited the manuscript, revised it critically, approved the final version to be published and made sure all the information presented in the manuscript was accurate.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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