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BMJ Case Reports 2015; doi:10.1136/bcr-2014-208033
  • CASE REPORT

Use of a medication passport in a disabled child seen across many care settings

  1. Mitchel Blair2
  1. 1Department of Pharmacy, Chelsea & Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Medicine, Imperial College, Middlesex, UK
  1. Correspondence to Professor Barry Jubraj, barry.jubraj{at}chelwest.nhs.uk
  • Accepted 29 January 2015
  • Published 25 February 2015

Summary

Written information for patients about their medicines has demonstrable benefits for their understanding and adherence. In the UK, no single, complete record of medications for individual patients can be guaranteed. Therefore, patients and carers are often relied on to recall the complete medication list, which can be a challenge given multiple and potentially stressful appointments. Wide-ranging feedback suggests that a medication ‘passport’ developed by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care North West London (NIHR CLAHRC NWL) has benefited elderly patients, who often attend many appointments where the current medication list may not be available. We describe the use of this passport (known as ‘My Medication Passport’—MMP) in a child with multiple disabilities. The practical advantages are explored, including the potential for a paediatric version to facilitate discussions around the administration of medicines. MMP is an early example of a useful tool to help children and young people, parents and carers to manage medicines more effectively.

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