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BMJ Case Reports 2013; doi:10.1136/bcr-2012-007072
  • CASE REPORT

Symptomatic sclerosing haemangioma: a rare case of solitary pulmonary nodule in a young girl

  1. Vijay Soren1
  1. 1Department of Pathology, CSM Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
  2. 2Department of CTVS, CSM Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Malti Kumari, mauryamalti{at}yahoo.co.in

Summary

Sclerosing haemangioma (SH) is a rare benign lung tumour with distinctive variety of histological patterns. SH typically presents as asymptomatic peripheral, solitary well-circumscribed lesion in women with median age at diagnosis in the fifth decade. Preoperative diagnosis of this tumour is difficult, and sometimes even intraoperative frozen sections cannot differentiate it from malignant tumours. Here, we present our experiences in investigating its characteristics. We report a case of a 19-year-old girl who presented with chest pain, cough and sputum and off and on haemoptysis for 6 months. Anti-tubercular treatment was given but provided no relief. CT chest showed a well-defined hypodense solid mass lesion with a soft tissue alternation. Lobectomy was performed. Microscopy revealed a tumour comprising of two distinct populations of cells surface and stromal cells which disposed in papillary, solid, sclerotic and haemorrhagic growth patterns. Histology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of SH of the lung.

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