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BMJ Case Reports 2012; doi:10.1136/bcr.12.2011.5394
  • Rare disease

‘A harmless but confusing tumour on the anterior maxilla’

  1. Niranjan S Yadav6
  1. 1Department of Periodontics, People’s College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  2. 2Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, People’s College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  3. 3Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, People’s College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  4. 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, People’s College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  5. 5Department of Public Health Dentistry, People’s College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  6. 6Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, People’s College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  1. Correspondence to Professor Preeti P Nair, shajihoss{at}gmail.com

Summary

Squamous odontogenic tumour (SOT) is a very rare benign neoplasm probably arising from rests of Malassez. Patients may present with an increase in the volume of the maxilla or mandible, tooth mobility, ulceration of the oral soft tissue, painful symptoms and tooth displacement. Radiographic features of SOT consist of a triangular-shaped radiolucent lesion adjacent to the roots of teeth. Histologically, care should be taken not to misdiagnose this condition as acanthomatous ameloblastoma or well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The authors are presenting a case of a 65-year-old male patient who presented with a painless swelling and diagnosed to be having SOT.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

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