rss
BMJ Case Reports 2012; doi:10.1136/bcr.01.2012.5543
  • Unusual association of diseases/symptoms

Pseudo-ischaemic ECG in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis surviving for a decade

  1. Yu-Jie Zhou2
  1. 1Cardiology Department, General Hospital of Beijing Military Command, Beijing, China
  2. 2Cardiology Department, Beijing Anzhen Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  3. 3Neurology Department, People’s Hospital Affiliated to Peking University, Beijing, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Yu-Jie Zhou, jackydang{at}163.com

Summary

A 58-year-old female with no history of heart disease was admitted to our hospital for abnormal ECG mimicking myocardial ischaemia. The ECG revealed persistent T-wave inversion in almost all leads, especially in precordial leads V2–V6. The patient had no complaints of chest pain, chest distress, short of breath or other atypical myocardial ischaemia symptoms. She had a history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with a disease course more than 20 years. Examinations help rule out other diseases causing persistent T-wave inversion. Importantly, cardiac catheterisation showed nearly normal coronary arteries that could rule out myocardial ischaemia. Accordingly, the authors presumed that the pseudo-ischaemic ECG was associated with ALS in this patient. The findings of the present case provide new evidence that autonomic nervous system may involve in the pathophysiological progress of ALS.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

Register for free content

The full text of all Editor's Choice articles and summaries of every article are free without registration

The full text of Images in ... articles are free to registered users

Only fellows can access the full text of case reports (apart from Editor's Choice) - become a fellow today, or encourage your institution to, so that together we can grow and develop this resource

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the case reports as they are published, and let us know what you think by commenting on the Editor's blog

Navigate This Article