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BMJ Case Reports 2009; doi:10.1136/bcr.10.2008.1170
  • Rare disease

Mucormycosis complicating lower limb crash injury in a multiple traumatised patient: an unusual case

  1. Mariusz Stasiak1,
  2. Alfred Samet2,
  3. Jerzy Lasek1,
  4. Maria Wujtewicz3,
  5. Zbigniew Witkowski1,
  6. Jolanta Komarnicka2,
  7. Katarzyna Golabek-Dropiewska1,
  8. Bartosz Rybak2,
  9. Marta Gross4,
  10. Wojciech Marks1
  1. 1
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Department of Trauma Surgery, Dêbinki Street 7, Gdañsk, 80-211, Poland
  2. 2
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Department of Clinical Microbiology Public Hospital No.1, Dêbinki Street 7, Gdañsk, 80-211, Poland
  3. 3
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Dêbinki Street 7, Gdañsk, 80-211, Poland
  4. 4
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Department of Pathology, Dêbinki Street 7, Gdañsk, 80-211, Poland
  1. Katarzyna Golabek-Dropiewska, ottoll{at}o2.pl
  • Published 28 April 2009

Summary

Necrotising skin and soft tissues infections are most commonly bacterial in origin. However, saprophytic fungi of the class Zygomycetes, family Mucoraceae, can cause highly aggressive infections (mucormycoses) mainly in immunocompromised patients. Severe trauma is one of the major risk factors for mucormycosis. Fungal traumatic wound infection is an unusual complication associated with crash limb injury. This report describes a case of serious necrotising soft tissue infection caused by Mucor sp following primary fungal environmental wound contamination in a multiply injured patient. Despite undelayed diagnosis and proper treatment (surgical debridement and limb amputation, amphotericin B therapy) the patient presented a fatal outcome.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: none.

  • Patient consent: Patient/guardian consent was obtained for publication.

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